Tagged: games

Mash Mash Restoration

This weekend was Global Game Jam 2020, and although I had planned to tackle my fifth consecutive attempt at the event over in Brighton (back where I first started), I ended up going for a third year at the University of Southampton. The weekend was bookended by work on Friday and a competition deadline on Monday so all in all it was easier to avoid any long journeys. I took a fairly relaxed approach to the challenge (not sleeping under a computer desk like last year) and, with the help of Paul Robins, put together a project I’m really quite happy with. The theme this year was “repair.”

Mash Mash Restoration is the first Game Jam project I’ve taken the lead in that wasn’t made in Twine. I put it together in GDevelop 5 (much like Flappy Bard, Cookie Cracker and Bananarchy). As the title mich suggest, it’s (almost) a rhythm game in which you use three different sorts of repair tools spread across three conveyor belts in order to fix an endless stream of broken(?) robots. Continue reading

Hear Me on Voice FM Tonight

I got a chance to show Bananarchy at a game developers’ event in Southampton last night, and as you might expect its fruit-based control scheme attracted a fair bit of attention.

Later on in the evening I did a quick interview with Voice FM, which you should be able to catch sometime around 7pm tonight. You can tune in on 103.9 FM if you’re in the area, or use the “listen live” option online if you’re farther afield. At least a couple of other games people I know were also interviewed, so it should be well worth watching out for!

EDIT: The programme is now available on Catch Up through this link. My interview begins at 1:34:00, but do have a listen to the other developers featured in the second hour: they’re working on some fantastic things!

Make Your Twine Games More Accessible

If you’re interested in learning to make games with Twine – and especially if you’re interested in using them to build up a portfolio – it’s well worth considering how to reach as many players as possible.

Anything that runs in a browser (such as a Twine game) will tend to be played more often that something must be installed, and anything that’s primarily text and choice -based (like most Twine games) is generally more accessible to players with disabilities than something that depends primarily on using quick reflexes to respond to graphics on screen. By making just a few small adjustments to your Twine games – such as ensuring your text is clearly legible, and adding descriptions to any visual media included along with it – you can boost their reach even further!

This post offers a few quick tips, as well as links to further resources if you want to look into the subject in a little more detail:

Hey all, After our group discussion about my “Disability Media” Twine project on Frost accessibility, I went on to do some further research on how to make Twine and the HTML you put in it as accessible as possible. I hope to update this post as I learn more, because this is actually to some […]

via Brief Understandings of HTML Accessibility — Electronic Literature & Digital Writing [2]

WordPlay 2019 Lineup Announced

Here’s something I’ve been waiting to share for a while: the lineup of games on show at WordPlay 2019 has now been announced!

WordPlay will be running on November 9th and 10th at the Toronto Reference Library. This is the same event that featured Wolf at the Door in 2018, and I’m pleased to say that they offered me the opportunity to judge games for the shortlist this time around! If you’re anywhere nearby that weekend, do drop in: I wasn’t sent everything that was submitted, but what I did play through was exceptionally good. It was tough to whittle it down to just the top few of those, and I’ve got no doubt that what the other judges chose must be similarly excellent.

Find Me on IFDB

I’ve made an account on The Interactive Fiction Database and am in the process of adding my Twine games. So far the only thing I’ve put on there is Draw Nine, but if you visit my profile you’ll also see Cragne Manor alongside it: the game page already listed me as a contributor at the point I signed up.

I aim eventually to have all my significant works of interactive fiction on there (ie. everything but the Twine for Beginners example pieces and some of the April Fools jokes), but if you’ve got any particular favourites then let me know in the comments and I’ll aim to get those in there first.

Alternatively, IFDB follows a Wikipedia sort of format where anyone can edit it, so if there’s anything you really want to see in there then you can add it yourself!

Cookie Cracker

Depending on how closely you follow my work – and in particular whether or not you’re subscribed to my monthly newsletter and all the goodies therein – you might be aware that I recently began supplementing my Twine projects with simple HTML5 games. For the moment these tend to revolve around well established (and thus easily replicated) mechanics, which is why the latest is…

Cookie Cracker!

If you’re familiar with incremental games (and especially if you’ve played Cookie Clicker specifically) then this will look a lot like what’s already out there. While I’m still getting the hang of Gdevelop5 – the tool I’ve been using for HTML5 games – it only makes sense to follow a tried and tested recipe (to keep things cookie-themed). However, even while aiming for a fairly safe format, I like to think that I’ll inevitably work in some new ingredients. Continue reading

Wolf at the Door Debuts at WordPlay 2018 — Deck of Bards

This Saturday I’ll be heading to London for AdventureX. Also this Saturday, Wolf at the Door – the collaborative folk horror game I’ve been working on for the past few months – will be heading to Toronto for WordPlay 2018. Check out the shamelessly self-reblogged post below for more details.

If you’re anywhere near Toronto and can make the trip, I highly recommend it: there are a whole lot of other great games (and talks) to catch as well, and you should also definitely check out the following post for those reasons as well.

I’d love to head to WordPlay myself but on top of having other plans and it being an impractically huge distance to travel (which pretty much rule it out anyway), they won’t even let me into Canada at the moment. In what feels like pretty much the most “me” turn of events ever, I can’t get to Canada right now because I’m Canadian. In order to fulfil the requirement that Canadian citizens travel into Canada on Canadian passports, I have to provide proof of Canadian citizenship or (potentially) be turned away for having Canadian citizenship. It’s hard to articulate just how stupid this is.

But this is getting a little off-track. The main thing take away from this post would be that you should definitely check out the following (much more professional) post on the Deck of Bards website. It includes a link to the Wolf at the Door demo – the first time it’s ever been available to anyone outside our team – and also you might like to subscribe to the Deck of Bards blog for more Wolf at the Door updates.

Hint hint.

Slice-of-life folk horror game Wolf at the Door will be on show for the first time ever at WordPlay, a free annual games festival hosted by the Hand Eye Society. This year’s event will be taking place from 12-5pm on November 10th at the Toronto Reference Library. The current version of the game contains only […]

via Wolf at the Door Debuts at WordPlay 2018 — Deck of Bards

Ultraviolent Unicorn Deathmatch of Destiny 2: Aquatic Boogaloo

Flash Fiction Month 2018, Day 31

Challenge #14: Write a story that includes a criminal character and is not set on dry land. It may be a 369er, an epistolary narrative, or a work of interactive fiction.

A hyperlinked version of this story is available here.

1

You are Wishes O’Houlihan, top agent of the International Leprechaun Police. Riding atop your mighty steed – a unicorn with a chainsaw for a horn – you are unstoppable.

Your mission is to take down Captain Blokebeard, the most notorious pirate of the North Specific.

…but how?

Parachute in! 2

Speedboat chase! 3

Launch yourself from a cannon! 4 Continue reading

Twine for Beginners: Using Variables

Back in my first Twine for Beginners tutorial (which I recommend at least taking a glance at before tackling this one), I mentioned that it was possible to do just about anything you see in the classic Fighting Fantasy books using only passages and hyperlinks. These gamebooks use a system of numbered passages and references, and choosing which passage to turn to performs exactly the same function as choosing which hyperlink to click in a Twine game. In addition to these standard choices, however, the passages will occasionally say something like “If you have a dagger, turn to 294. If you do not have a dagger, turn to 334.”

I think if I were going to fight Eyeface McBlubberson or Beardy the Dragon Wizard then I’d probably want something bigger than a dagger, but whatever.

There’s a totally obvious way to do this in Twine, and that’s to directly copy the method used in this Fighting Fantasy book. “[[If you have a dagger, click here]]. [[If you do not have a dagger, click here]]” will do exactly the same job and involves absolutely no Twine know-how that wasn’t covered in my first tutorial. If you’re happy to simply ask the reader to keep track of their previous choices (or note things down on some kind of character/inventory sheet) and don’t fancy reading on, then you can just do that. Continue reading

Join me at Southampton Global Game Jam!

From the 26th to the 28th of January, you’ll find me at the University of Southampton for the Southampton Global Game Jam, working on something that should at least vaguely resemble a videogame.

https://happeninghq-media.s3.amazonaws.com/1/events/41a394186fcb409f89d27623c06762ec.png

2018 will be my third year joining in with the Global Game Jam, but unlike the last two I won’t be making a trip to Brighton for the occasion. There are a handful of reasons for this:

  • Brighton is kind of a hike for me and between promoting Ten Little Astronauts and exhibiting Girth Loinhammer’s Exponential Adventure I’ve already travelled around a TON over the past few months.
  • I feel like I know a good chunk of the Brighton crowd by this point (and it’s pretty likely I’ll see some of them at other events later in the year).
  • I actually don’t know all that many game developers based near me, and this seems like a good opportunity to sort that out.

Because of all of that, I’ll be staying in Southampton this time around! One other upside is that I figure it’ll be easier for anyone I know who maybe doesn’t already make games but would like to have a go. My usual approach to these things is to turn up (possibly late, if the journey involves trains), wander about chatting to people, then join whatever group will have me and/or seems to be thinking through the neatest idea. However, on this occasion I figure I might actually be in a position to take a team with me! Continue reading