Tagged: Winchester

Eagle Island

Back at Winchester Comic Con I was pleased to discover Eagle Island, a procedurally generated platformer with beautiful pixel art and really tight controls. Well, it’s since launched on Kickstarter and I’ve been backing it since the very beginning. I’ve also made an effort to share/retweet any choice bits of news: most recently that there’s now a (Windows) demo available so you can have a go.

There’s now some extra news to share, and this time I think it’s big enough to warrant an actual blog post. The project is now more than half funded but there’s only a week to go. Naturally I’d like to see this game get made so that’s worth getting out there in its own right! However, there’s more to it than that. In order to drum up interest, Nick Gregory, the guy behind Eagle Island is running a draw to design a monster appearing in the game. Ordinarily this would be one of the £250 rewards, but the draw opens up the chance to any backer who either gets a friend on board or backs the project having heard about it from a friend. Long story short, if you support Eagle Island and tell Nick I sent you, both of us have a shot at designing a monster.

Basically, I think this is both a great reward for this particular game and a neat idea in general. I’m tempted to shamelessly steal it for my Ten Little Astronauts campaign, but until then Eagle Island is your best bet for this particular variety of crowdfunding-based fun. Please do take a look! I know from experience that simply making people aware of a project is the hardest thing about crowdfunding. If it’s not your cup of tea, fair enough. If it is, back the project and tell them where you heard about it!

Places to Meet Me this Month

I realise we’re halfway through March at this point, but wow is that second half packed full of things to do! If you fancy meeting me in person, you’ll have plenty of chances over the coming couple of weeks (though it helps if you’re currently in the southern half of the UK). Here’s what’s coming up, in order:

Truth is Like a Lazarus Launch

(University of Reading [Van Emden Theatre, HumSS Building], 6pm Monday 20th March)

I got my BA it the University of Reading, and after getting in touch to let them know about my recent success with Ten Little Astronauts, I was invited to submit something to this year’s Reading Creative Arts Anthology, Truth is Like a Lazarus; or, A Roof Bursting with Stars. That something is in there now, and if you turn up in the Van Emden Theatre at 6pm you’ll hopefully have the chance to hear me read it!

As an added bonus, the HumSS building is worth a visit in its own right: think “Hogwarts as imagined by M.C. Escher.” In my second year I almost missed a class because it took place on a floor I didn’t know existed. Fortunately,  however, the Van Emden Theatre is up just one flight of stairs visible from the main entrance. Reading’s Whiteknights Campus is full of quirky things like this: it was very nearly declared a Site of Special Scientific Interest and has its own (obsolete) nuclear bunker. Well worth taking the time explore beforehand if you do decide to come to this event!

Winchester Comic Con

(Winchester Discovery Centre, 9am – 6pm, Saturday 25th March)

The first ever Winchester Comic Con is coming up, and I’ll be on the first ever author panel! I’m also one of the judges for the flash fiction competition, so if you fancy making a day of it then come prepared with a ≤100 word speculative fiction story. The competition is open to anybody with a ticket (which presumably you’ll need to get in there anyway, though it may be possible to pay on the door) and this is very much my kind of thing.

As you might expect from a nine-hour event, there’ll be lots going on. There’ll be guests from Harry Potter, Star Wars and Doctor Who, as well as the world’s leading Tintinologist (an expert on Tintin) Michael Farr. Also, it’s not certain at this point but I’m hoping fellow Unbound author Niall Slater will be there too.

EGX Rezzed

(Tobacco Dock, London, 30th March – 1st April)

After having a really great time at EGX in September last year, I’ll be returning for EGX Rezzed at the end of the month! I say “returning” but actually this’ll be a fairly different event. For one thing it’s in London rather than Birmingham, and for another the focus is more on PC and indie titles such as Craft Keep VR, which will be on display there!

For anyone who hasn’t been following for a while, I first came across Craft Keep at EGX and, soon afterwards, ended up writing for it. That was a bit of a dream come true, really. EGX was the first games event I ever went to, and standing in the massive crowd heading in at the start of the first day, I never imagined I’d have my own work on show in the next one I went to. It was only an outside possibility even at the point I was on the train back home! I met a lot of great people at the last event (and bumped into a couple of people I’d already met at the Brighton Global Game Jam), and I’m hoping there’ll be a chance to catch up with at least some of them at this one.

As the “VR” in “Craft Keep VR” might imply, this is a virtual reality title and you’ll need a VR headset and motion controllers to play it. For most people (including me) then, an event like EGX is your main chance to give it a go. Tickets are available here, and they’re actually not too pricy considering the range of games you get to see! I gather that Rezzed will be more low-key than regular EGX – I’m not expecting to grab quite as many free T-shirts (if any) this time around – but even so you’re looking at three full days of gaming for less than the price of one current-gen console release. It’s certainly cheaper than buying an Oculus Rift or HTC Vive if you just want a go at Craft Keep VR!

And that’s it.

I’ve got a few more things planned over the last little while, quite a few of them related to Ten Little Astronauts, but none of those involve turning up places in person. Or at least, none of the ones that do really offer an opportunity to meet up with people. If you are planning to head to any of these, though – whether you’re near Reading or Winchester or fancy a trip into London for EGX – then let me know! It would be great to say hi.

Graduation Day

Before Ten Little Astronauts was launched by Unbound – submarine promo video and all – it formed the bulk of my work for an MA in Creative and Critical Writing at the University of Winchester. The way the course was weighted, that one project was just about as important as every other module combined. On top of that, in a move that I can only assume was intended to keep postgrads up all night to finish the thing, that final project would dictate the upper limit on your results. You could hand in the greatest works of literature ever devised for the smaller modules, then still end up disappointed on results day if the big one didn’t measure up.

Well, on Friday I graduated with Distinction.

Second from right: me. Also pictured: some of the greatest writers I’ve ever met.

It’s been a long time since I actually got my results. The ceremony was held in Winchester Cathedral – the largest medieval cathedral in the world still standing – and the University can only use it so many days each year. Given that it takes a while to mark all those novella-length projects, we didn’t get our results in time to graduate the same year as we handed them in. Still, good things are worth waiting for, and I’m pleased to have already had some success with Ten Little Astronauts in particular.

Continue reading

Ten Little Astronauts at Ten Percent!

Ten Little Astronauts has hit 10% funding. Double digits!

Everyone who’s pledged so far has done their bit to get the book to the stage it’s at now, and you’ve all earned my eternal gratitude. Still I’d like to thank The Writers at Lovedean in particular for having me over to speak and to run a little flash fiction exercise at their group: their very short stories had me very impressed! While I was there, Charlotte Comley also filmed me (and I her) for her vlog, so check out this video for my top five writing tips.

10% is quite a milestone, but there’s still quite a way to go. If you haven’t pledged already, doing so now would be a real boost to the book. If you have pledged already but want to help further, please consider recommending Ten Little Astronauts to a friend. You’ll have someone to follow along with, and the book will be that much closer to publication.

Winchester Writers’ Festival 2016 Writeup

The Winchester Writers’ Festival is always a big event. I always meet a whole bunch of interesting people, and I always learn a whole lot of new things. Because a lot of elements of the event are the same every year, I think it’s probably not worth trying to write out an introduction to it every time. If you want an introduction, you might like to take a look at my writeup of the Festival in 2014, which covered my first impressions about it (though I only had a one-day ticket), and/or my writeup of the Festival in 2015, when I was chosen for a scholarship and so could afford to turn up for the whole three days.

This year, in terms of a ticket, I went for something of a middle ground. Having had a bursary the first year I went and a scholarship the second (and having got a steady job after that), I felt as though I’d had as much financial help as I could justify. As great as it would have been to turn up for the whole three days, I decided to just go for a Saturday and Sunday ticket, and turn up for the free evening events on the Friday.

I’ve read at the Friday open mic three years in a row now, but this is the first time I’ve got a recording of it. I pretty much just handed my phone to a friend (thanks for that!) so the audio quality isn’t great, but thanks to the university’s microphone and speaker setup I think it’s at least comprehensible. I had prepared to read Osiris Likes This, but since the length of each open mic slot was dropped from five to four minutes, there wasn’t quite long enough and I went for The Three Idols instead. Continue reading

Book Fairs and Spine Design

It’s taken me a little longer than I’d hoped to write about the Alresford Literary Festival and Hampshire Writers’ Society Book Fair, largely because I attended the Winchester Writers’ Festival immediately afterwards and was all set up to run Flash Fiction Day immediately after that. June has been absolutely crammed full of good stuff, but it has made it rather difficult to find the time to write about any of it.

My table at the Alresford Literary Festival.

My table at the Alresford Literary Festival.

I’ve now attended three book fairs in total, having started with one held by the Hampshire Writers’ Society last year, and though I’m hardly an expert at this sort of thing, I’ve noticed enough similarities between all three events that I feel as though it’s worth considering them all as a bundle rather than trying to get into what happened at each one. So far they’ve been much the same, which is great because I always seem to get a lot out of them. Continue reading

HWS Book Fair 2016

The Hampshire Writers’ Society Book Fair is coming up on the 14th of June. That’s this Tuesday!

My table at the Alresford Literary Festival.

My display at the Alresford Literary Festival, which I’ll be taking along to the Book Fair.

I mentioned this in a recent blog post that focused mostly on the Alresford Literary Festival, but the Hampshire Writers’ event was such a success last year that I think it’s worth giving it a post all to itself. If you’re in the Winchester area, I’d really recommend going: there are a lot of authors who’ll be turning up. The place to be is the Stripe Building at the University of Winchester (on Sparkford Road): it starts at 6.

If you can’t make it, I’ll be aiming to write all about the event (and the Alresford festival) here. However, the Winchester Writers’ Festival is now less than a week away as well, so I can’t say for sure exactly when I’ll get around to it: June is a very busy month, and naturally I don’t expect July to leave me much more time!

(TM) Audio Recording

I mentioned a while back that I’d be doing more audio work similar to The Mucky Angel, and here it is!

You might remember this story from Red Herring, my 2013 flash fiction collection. Well, a few weeks ago I was running a workshop at Winchester College and I’d been asked to read out a few of my stories. One of the points I wanted to make was that comedy in writing works best when you combine an absurd situation with a twist ending, and I felt as though (TM) did a pretty good job of illustrating that. However, it involves a lot of character speech without a whole lot of narration and, when read aloud, the only way I could make it clear who’s who was to give the characters silly voices. So I booked some time in the university recording booths to make sure I wouldn’t sound totally ridiculous attempting to voice “Big Harry.”

Turns out that I do. However, it was funny enough that I decided to stick with it. Continue reading

Winchester Writers’ Festival Bursaries/Scholarships

Booking for the 2016 Winchester Writers’ Festival is now open, and so are applications for bursaries and scholarships. Since these schemes helped me get to the festival twice–in 2014 with a bursary and in 2015 with a scholarship–it seems well worthwhile passing on the message and making sure that the event is open to everyone who wants to go.

Writers' Festival Scholarship Photo

Scholarships:

  • Are limited to writers aged 18-25.
  • Cover the entire cost of a full weekend ticket to the festival.
  • Are extremely competitive: there are only 10 places available.
  • Close on April 7th, 2016.

Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to be a student to apply for a scholarship. If you are, it’s probably to your advantage because that demonstrates a commitment to writing, but you can demonstrate that commitment in any number of other ways. Full details of the application process can be found here, but it ultimately boils down to showing that you’re already working hard at becoming a better writer and that a ticket to the festival would further your goals.

Bursaries:

  • Are open to anyone.
  • Cover £50 of the cost of any festival ticket.
  • Are far less competitive than scholarships.
  • Close on April 15th, 2016.

A bursary will only cover a bit more than a tenth of the cost of a full weekend ticket, so probably won’t make for an opportunity to stick around for the whole thing. However, every little helps, so if you aren’t eligible for (or don’t manage to get) a scholarship then applying for a bursary would still be well worthwhile. It would, for example, nearly halve the price of a Sunday ticket (though I’d highly recommend choosing a day that includes some one-to-one appointments as these are extremely helpful). Full details are available on the same page as the scholarship information (but you have to scroll down a bit). Continue reading

New Year, New Decisions

I’ve never really been a fan of New Year’s resolutions. They seem like a handy excuse for putting off doing anything until January 1st, and later on a handy excuse for giving up for ten months when you fail spectacularly in early March.

That said, starting something at the beginning of a new year does make it easy to set up a schedule, and so on this occasion I’ll be joining in too. My New Year’s not-resolution is to write a game article a week. At the moment I’m hoping to make most of them reviews of specific titles, but I’ve also got plenty of ideas for articles about game design and mechanics. Most likely there’ll be a fair bit of crossover between the two. The main thing I’ve settled on at this point is that whatever they are, there’ll be 52 of them by the end of the year. Or at the very least, there’ll be a dozen-ish by early March.

In the past it’s proven difficult to keep up weekly or even fortnightly updates. Beyond the Black Throne became problematic partly because I was juggling it with an MA course that steadily demanded more and more of my attention, but also because the interactive format made for tight deadlines and more or less eliminated the possibility of building up “buffer” updates that I could write ahead of time and post when necessary. Producing images and animation to illustrate the story—however hilariously amateurish those things were—also took a lot of planning and ate up a lot of time.

The Lash of Khgharghag

I sure hope this doesn’t end up being the preview image for this blog post.

I’m still planning to pick up the story again at some point, but in the interests of producing something on a regular basis and building up my games-related portfolio, I feel as though the reviews are a safer bet for the time being. For one thing, I’ve already played through a bunch of games that I’d like to write about, which means I’m already halfway towards having a “buffer” ready. For another, games (even if they’re primarily text-based) offer the possibility of illustrating a post with screenshots, which don’t take too much effort on my part.

My Epistory review was remarkably quick to put together.

I expect it’ll take a while to play through anything I’m going to write about, which isn’t a challenge I had to face with Beyond the Black Throne, but at the same time that seems more compatible with my job at the moment than responding to reader suggestions and fiddling about with paper cut-outs. I could happily fit in the button-mashing after a day at work, then write the actual article on one of my days off. Combined with the buffer posts, that should ensure I’m able to keep these things regular.

But beyond that particular goal for the year, I’ve got another decision to make. I’ve still got access to the university recording equipment, and while that’s the case I want to make the most of it. However, that’ll mostly mean recording things I’ve already written, and I’d quite like to keep producing new stories at the same time. So here’s a question for you:

“New, experimental things” at the moment will likely involve audio, video, or interactive fiction. They’re by no means limited to that, though.

In any case, I’ll be doing a little bit of both either way. If you’re curious to see something a little different from me, I hope to have some recordings done in the not too distant future (and perhaps some 3D printed things too). If you want conventional stories, I’ll be including a brand new one in each of my monthly newsletters.

Happy New Year!