Tagged: prize

Lovely Pleasant Teatime Simulator

I have a brand new Twine game for you, and this one comes with Prizes!

Lovely Pleasant Teatime Simulator is a relaxing narrative game about—

Actually, you know what? I’m not gonna bother. You know this isn’t really a straightforward Afternoon Tea simulator, and I know you know, so there’s really no point in me typing up a description pretending that it is. Continue reading

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Announcing Project Procrustes

Project Procrustes is my latest work of interactive fiction, and I’m pleased to say that (besides Girth Loinhammer’s Most Exponential Adventure), it’s the largest yet! It clocks in at 23,649 words according to Twine’s built-in counter, though I’ve put considerable effort into making the text of individual passages react to past choices, so you’re not likely to see most of those words unless you play through many many times.

Like the other titles in my “Project” series, Project Procrustes focuses on one particular element of player interaction and explores it as fully as possible. In this case, that element is character customisation. All my previous Twine works have seen you taking on the role of a particular pre-selected character – whether that’s the nameless officer in Blacklight 1995 or the far too fleshed-out Girth Loinhammer in Exponential Adventure – and then the story branches out from there. Project Procrustes, on the other hand, provides you with a very sophisticated character creation tool up front and lets you begin your adventure as one of four classes (each with their own strengths and weaknesses) with points distributed across four essential stats. You can alter your character’s name and appearance too.

These early choices will prove extremely important over the course of your quest: the default barbarian protagonist might be able to casually blunder through enemy encounters, but a rogue would do better to try and avoid getting into such scuffles in the first place (and, to that end, is better equipped to avoid being seen). I strongly recommend trying a few different classes with their stats distributed in different ways: the prospect of flinging spells about may be very tempting, but you’ll be missing a lot of the game if you only ever play as a mage.

To make things interesting and hopefully get this game some extra attention (as it turned out to be a far, far bigger project than I initially planned), I’ll be sending a Steam key for Noio’s excellent Kingdom: New Lands to the first person to share a screenshot of Project Procrustes’ true ending. To avoid any confusion (since there are a couple of occasions in the game when your character can choose to simply walk away from their quest), this is the passage that ends with green text and does not include a “Restart?” or “SAVE GAME” link.

Happy questing – and may the best barbarian, rogue, mage or hunter win!

Please be aware that, having released Project Procrustes with this little competition in mind, I’ve taken certain precautions to prevent cheating. Revealing my methods would almost certainly make them less effective, so I’ll simply say that I believe I’ve been thorough enough that if you can reach that end screen without progressing through the game in the intended fashion (and without me noticing), you’ll have earned your Steam key anyway.

Eagle Island

Back at Winchester Comic Con I was pleased to discover Eagle Island, a procedurally generated platformer with beautiful pixel art and really tight controls. Well, it’s since launched on Kickstarter and I’ve been backing it since the very beginning. I’ve also made an effort to share/retweet any choice bits of news: most recently that there’s now a (Windows) demo available so you can have a go.

There’s now some extra news to share, and this time I think it’s big enough to warrant an actual blog post. The project is now more than half funded but there’s only a week to go. Naturally I’d like to see this game get made so that’s worth getting out there in its own right! However, there’s more to it than that. In order to drum up interest, Nick Gregory, the guy behind Eagle Island is running a draw to design a monster appearing in the game. Ordinarily this would be one of the £250 rewards, but the draw opens up the chance to any backer who either gets a friend on board or backs the project having heard about it from a friend. Long story short, if you support Eagle Island and tell Nick I sent you, both of us have a shot at designing a monster.

Basically, I think this is both a great reward for this particular game and a neat idea in general. I’m tempted to shamelessly steal it for my Ten Little Astronauts campaign, but until then Eagle Island is your best bet for this particular variety of crowdfunding-based fun. Please do take a look! I know from experience that simply making people aware of a project is the hardest thing about crowdfunding. If it’s not your cup of tea, fair enough. If it is, back the project and tell them where you heard about it!

Ten Little Astronauts has 125 Supporters!

As promised, here I am picking a name from a hat to determine which of these lucky people get a free, signed copy of Kicking and Screaming:

There’s been a lot of interest in Ten Little Astronauts recently and thanks partly to a couple of really good events this month, a whole bunch of those draw places went pretty much overnight. And by “a whole bunch,” I honestly mean about half. They went fast.

If you didn’t put in your pledge in time (or if you did but weren’t that one lucky person who got the book), then no worries. There’ll be other giveaways, but on top of that I’m planning a slightly different reward to mark the 150 supporter milestone, and this one will go out to the first 150 supporters. All of them. Every single one.

As I say in the video above, the plan at the moment is to put together an interactive story (written in Twine, the same software I’ve used for just about all of my interactive works so far) set on board a gigantic spacecraft and featuring the first 150 supporters as its crew. A lot of Unbound authors offer a “name a character” reward but since that’s not an option for Ten Little Astronauts itself (which has exactly ten characters, all of them named after Agatha Christie’s ten from And Then There Were None), I feel as though this is a good way of giving everyone a mention in something else.

If you’ve already put in a pledge for Ten Little Astronauts, then there’s nothing more you need to do: I’ll be working on this new reward as the supporter count ticks up to 150. However, if you’d like to help more – and especially if there’s anyone whose name you’d like to see in this new work – then please encourage your friends to jump on board! They’ll also get their name in the back of Ten Little Astronauts itself once it’s published, but only the first 150 will get a place in this interactive story.

Ten Little Astronauts has 100 Supporters!

As milestones go, this one’s kind of a biggie. Ten Little Astronauts has reached 100 supporters, which was the target I set for my first book giveaway. One lucky person–revealed in the video above–is getting a signed copy of Robocopout as soon as I have one to send.

Robocopout Cover

In terms of funding, Ten Little Astronauts is currently at 22%, so there’s quite a way to go. However, just the sheer number of people who’ve pledged to support it by this point is a huge boost. I’ve seen other books on Unbound published with under 100 supporters. If this were just an ebook, we’d be there already. But it’s not. There’ll be a super high-quality first edition for supporters, with a trade paperback distributed by Penguin Random House. That’s where the other 78% comes in, which will probably mean reaching another 300 or so people, but hey. There are 100 people on board already: there are at least 300 more out there.

If you’d like to be one of those fantastic people who gets their name in the back of the book and a ton of neat rewards along the way, you can pledge your support right here on Unbound.

Breakfast at Timmy’s

Flash Fiction Month 2016, Day 24

“I can’t believe you’re eating poutine for breakfast,” said Mike, staring at Joe over his huge stack of pancakes.

“I can’t believe you’re not!” said Joe, setting the mountainous pile of food down on the tree stump they’d taken to using as a breakfast table. “Fries, cheese curds, gravy…it’s got everything a growing lumberjack needs!”

“Yeah. Because nobody in the history of the world has ever associated pancakes with lumberjacks.”

Suddenly, as if enraged by sarcasm, a moose charged out of the trees and straight through the lumberjacks’ breakfast.

“Well that was something, eh?” said Joe. Then he noticed the state of his breakfast. “Aww. That moose got maple syrup all over my poutine. Could you lend me a toonie for another?”

Mike was about to say “no,” and follow it up with, “but is it seriously just two dollars, because that’s either really good or really suspicious,” but he was drowned out by the sudden appearance of a helicopter descending into the clearing. Continue reading