Tagged: books

We All Saw It Coming Launch – April 3rd at The Railway

The launch event for We All Saw It Coming will be at The Railway Inn, 7:30pm on the 3rd of April. The Railway is a great venue – I’m there at least once a month since they host the Poetry Platform open mic – and if you fancy catching some excellent stories, music and/or poems then you can stick around afterwards for that very event (starting at 9pm, with sign-up for slots in the half hour beforehand).

If you’d like to come along, you can RSVP and get updates through this Facebook event, or you can just show up on the night. I’ll be bringing copies of all my books, though probably not a huge number of each: I’ve written enough by this point that it’s getting difficult to cart everything to events. If you’d like me to sign something, you might be better off getting hold of it beforehand and bringing it with you to avoid disappointment. I’ve run out before! Continue reading


We All Saw It Coming Paperback Now Available

It’s here at last! The paperback version of We All Saw It Coming, my flash fiction anthology for 2017.

If you’ve come across previous anthologies in the series, you’ll know the deal: 31 stories, each written on a single day during July as part of Flash Fiction Month. The stories are generally funny, sometimes serious, and don’t really match up to any kind of theme. Except on this occasion, maybe, when you might be forgiven for thinking that the theme is bananas. Continue reading

Ten Little Astronauts is Fully Funded!

We did it! Ten Little Astronauts has all the funding it needs to make it into print (and then some!). Unbound has just moved it over to the paperback list, which means it now has 131% of its target. That’s pretty incredible, and it’s all down to the people who pledged or just generally helped to get it in front of enough readers to make this happen. Continue reading

We All Saw It Coming Ebook Available

We All Saw It Coming, my Flash Fiction Month anthology for 2017, is now available as an ebook through Smashwords. It’ll be available through other retailers shortly, but I haven’t yet assigned it an ISBN because I’m still confirming that everything is working as it should.

The sheer scale of this year’s interactive fiction challenge, Ultraviolent Unicorn Deathmatch of Destiny, meant that I had to set up internal hyperlinks just to make it navigable. There was some extra faff involved in making sure I didn’t end up with all 48 of those listed in the book’s table of contents, and although everything seems to have worked out fine, there were enough opportunities for things to go wrong that I don’t like to assume they haven’t. Still, whether or not this story turned out perfect first time, I’ve definitely got a better grasp of how to handle interactive fiction in this format than I had before, and so at some point I expect I’ll be going back and giving the same treatment to Robocopout‘s interactive fiction piece, Inquisition.

The next job will be to format and publish the paperback, and when that’s available I’m strongly considering having a launch party of some kind! This book completes the six-colour cycle I’ve been working towards (I’ll be sticking another orange object on the cover of whatever I write for 2018), so although I’ve never made all that much of a song and dance about the release of these books in the past, I feel as though this is a good enough occasion to start.

Since this is pretty much the first book launch I’ve ever organised, I’m keen to get an idea of how many people would be likely to turn up, as well as where they’d be able to get to. The poll above allows multiple answers: feel free to tick as many as you like. In fact, ideally don’t be too picky: if you really could make it to any of these places, that gives me more options to work with. Conversely, picking only Southampton because you live there could screw things up quite a bit: if 30 people only pick the closest Hampshire town, they could quite easily be outvoted by half that number in London.

Promoting Ten Little Astronauts has put my work in front of people from much farther afield than before, so I’m really not sure where most of my followers are based at this point. My guess is that most know me from various local open mics – and I’d probably prefer a local launch myself – but the biggest events have been in London, and those are generally the ones where my name’s been on the flyers and whatnot. Ultimately I figure the thing to do is to hold the launch wherever people can get to it, so that’s why I’ve put out this poll. Tick whichever boxes work for you, pass it on to anyone else you think might like to come along for readings and live interactive fiction, and if you’ve got any other thoughts then leave those in the comments. As always, you don’t need an account or even an email address: just type words into the box, hit “Post” and it’ll get to me.

What Now for Ten Little Astronauts?

The Christmas deadline for funding Ten Little Astronauts has now passed, but since nobody’s in the Unbound office over the holidays there’s technically nothing stopping people from contributing. If you meant to pledge before Christmas and are currently kicking yourself for missing your chance, don’t do that. There’s still time, and your support can still make a difference.

Artwork by Joe Wright

It’s pretty much certain that there are still people out there who’d pledge if they simply knew about the book – so if there’s a friend you’ve been meaning to tell about it, it would be absolutely great if you could do that – but personally I’ll be focusing on other things for the next little while. Once Unbound opens up again in the New Year I expect to hear from Scott Pack about what the options are for Ten Little Astronauts – at 72% funded and with 245 people already lined up to get a copy, I think it’s in a pretty good position right now – but until that happens there won’t be much news.

In the meantime, I’m hoping to get this year’s flash fiction anthology – We All Saw It Coming – wrapped up while it still is actually this year. Ideally I’d like to get the ebook out before 2018, but the paperback may be a little longer. I might also do a little work on the interactive sci-fi story I offered as a reward for the first 150 supporters of Ten Little Astronauts. I’ve been looking forward to working on that for a long time!

As always, thanks to everyone who’s put in a pledge for Ten Little Astronauts, or even just passed it on to somebody else. The response to this book has been just mind-boggling, and everyone who’s done anything to help it out has had a hand in that. Thanks!

Last Chance to Support Ten Little Astronauts

It’s the eleventh hour. Aragorn is making his “It is not this day” speech. The rebels are approaching the Death Star. Neville Longbottom has destroyed the final horcrux and Harry Potter is preparing to battle Lord Voldemort. I’m not familiar with Twilight, but I’m sure there’s some confrontation between Heartthrob McSparklepants and a bad guy of some kind.

The point is, there are just days left to fund Ten Little Astronauts. At 63%, it’s the bulk of the way there and it has a solid chance of reaching its target, but only if the people who want that to happen make it happen.

At this point, you’re either behind the book or you’re not: there’s no time left to “get around to it.” 213 people (at current count) have pledged for a copy of their own. Countless more have shared it, told their friends about it, and generally helped it along in less direct ways. If it’s not your kind of thing, I get it. If you can’t afford to chip in for a copy right now, I definitely get it. But if you’d like to help my career as an author all the same, doing something – anything – to spread the word about it before that Christmas deadline would make a spectacular difference to the book’s chances of success at absolutely no cost to you. Continue reading

Ten Little Astronauts in the News

One of the advantages of having already gained a substantial level of support for Ten Little Astronauts – which is now more than halfway funded with over 200 supporters – is that it’s started to attract more attention from the media. It ended up in the news twice this week, so I thought I’d go ahead and share!

This article was the result of an interview with Lev Lourie (with the photo taken at Fair Oak Library), and appeared in the new Eastleigh Times on the 30th of November:

Just the next day, on December 1st, the book also got a place in Portsmouth’s Star & Crescent under the headline: Bringing Agatha Christie into the Space Age Might Land Local Writer a Book Deal. I actually wrote this one myself, as a contributor!

It’s great to see the book reaching a wider audience, and I hope this will help to secure the rest of the funding by the Christmas deadline. Still, if you want to help the book out and would like to spread this around yourself, that would make even more of a difference!

Ten Little Astronauts at 200 Supporters and 50 Percent!

Ten Little Astronauts reached two absolutely enormous milestones on the very same day: there are now over 200 individual people who’ve put in a pledge for a copy, and they’ve collectively taken it up to 50% of its funding goal.

This is pretty fantastic, because as well as the truly massive supporter count – which is already larger than many Unbound titles ever reach – there’s now less money still to raise than has been raised so far. Yeah, it says 50% on the book page right now, but it’s actually a whole lot closer to 51%: one more pledge could do it. Continue reading

Ten Little Astronauts Christmas Deadline

This is probably the biggest development since Unbound originally launched their crowdfunding campaign for Ten Little Astronauts, so if you’re interested in the book please have a read and share with anyone you think might be interested. (Ideally everyone, because hey, you never know.) The main thing to take away is this: if the book is going to be distributed through Penguin Random House, it must reach its funding target by Christmas.

Ten Little Astronauts has amassed an absolutely staggering amount of support since it launched, and I want to stress that this success is actually part of the reason Unbound would like to call an end to the campaign. There’s already enough funding and interest to print the book as part of a new paperback list with a lower budget (which is what will happen if we don’t hit 100% by Christmas), but naturally I’m keen to take one final shot at that original goal. If we can do that, I’ll see my work distributed by Penguin Random House, and you’ll get a more impressive paperback.

It’s actually been about a week since I announced this deadline on Unbound directly (it’s taken me a while to share the news here because my priority was contacting people who’d already said they intended to pledge), and in that time the campaign has shot to nearly 50% funding. We hit the 40% and 45% milestones in the same week (and if you’re supporting the book yourself, you can find the relevant rewards here and here respectively). Basically, having an end point in sight has done wonders for the book.

If you’d like to see Ten Little Astronauts reach its goal, there are three things you can do:

  • Put in a pledge, if you haven’t already. The sooner, the better! This is ultimately the only way the book will be funded, and having lots of supporters helps shows that people have confidence in it.
  • Upgrade or donate, if you’ve already pledged. I don’t like to pester people who’ve already been kind enough to put in a pledge, but this really would help a lot. If you’re especially keen to see Ten Little Astronauts succeed, you can either upgrade to a higher pledge level for more rewards, or use Unbound’s nifty new “donate” option to chip in a little more just to help the book along.
  • TELL YOUR FRIENDS, even if you haven’t pledged yourself (but especially if you have). I understand that Ten Little Astronauts won’t be for everyone: no book is. However, if you enjoy my other work and would like to see me succeed as an author, simply telling other people that Ten Little Astronauts exists would do wonders to help that happen. People can’t pledge if they don’t know about it in the first place! Sharing these updates, or showing the pitch video to any sci-fi fans you know: it all helps the book reach the readers who’ll ultimately make it a reality.

Needless to say, it would also help me out tremendously if you could get the word out about this new deadline in particular. 🙂

Craft Keep VR up for Another Game of the Year Award

You might recall that Craft Keep VR, the virtual reality game I ended up writing for after EGX 2016, was up for a Game of the Year award at Login Vilnius a while back. Well, it’s happened again, and this time it’s through the TIGA Games Industry Awards!

This time around, Craft Keep VR is right alongside big names like Forza Horizon and Horizon: Zero Dawn. Even just in its own category – Game by a Small Studio – there’s Yooka-Laylee and The Flame in the Flood, both of which have quite a bit more clout behind them than “Small Studio” would suggest: the teams behind those include some of the people behind Banjo-KazooieHalo and BioShock.

I hesitate to ask people to vote in this because I’m aware fairly few will have the VR hardware necessary to actually  play Craft Keep, but if you’re in a position to compare the games in the shortlist (maybe you got a go at EGX or EGX Rezzed), then here’s the page where you can vote for your favourite.

Continue reading