Tagged: bursary

Winchester Writers’ Festival Bursaries/Scholarships

Booking for the 2016 Winchester Writers’ Festival is now open, and so are applications for bursaries and scholarships. Since these schemes helped me get to the festival twice–in 2014 with a bursary and in 2015 with a scholarship–it seems well worthwhile passing on the message and making sure that the event is open to everyone who wants to go.

Writers' Festival Scholarship Photo

Scholarships:

  • Are limited to writers aged 18-25.
  • Cover the entire cost of a full weekend ticket to the festival.
  • Are extremely competitive: there are only 10 places available.
  • Close on April 7th, 2016.

Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to be a student to apply for a scholarship. If you are, it’s probably to your advantage because that demonstrates a commitment to writing, but you can demonstrate that commitment in any number of other ways. Full details of the application process can be found here, but it ultimately boils down to showing that you’re already working hard at becoming a better writer and that a ticket to the festival would further your goals.

Bursaries:

  • Are open to anyone.
  • Cover £50 of the cost of any festival ticket.
  • Are far less competitive than scholarships.
  • Close on April 15th, 2016.

A bursary will only cover a bit more than a tenth of the cost of a full weekend ticket, so probably won’t make for an opportunity to stick around for the whole thing. However, every little helps, so if you aren’t eligible for (or don’t manage to get) a scholarship then applying for a bursary would still be well worthwhile. It would, for example, nearly halve the price of a Sunday ticket (though I’d highly recommend choosing a day that includes some one-to-one appointments as these are extremely helpful). Full details are available on the same page as the scholarship information (but you have to scroll down a bit). Continue reading

Winchester Writers’ Festival 2015 Writeup

Last weekend wasn’t my first time at the Winchester Writers’ Festival, but thanks to a scholarship from the University of Winchester, it was the first year I managed to attend the entire event. That really made quite a difference, since the full range of day courses, talks and workshops offered far more variety than I could have got from any individual day. It was particularly useful to be able to get advice on both writing and publishing. Here’s how the weekend went:

Friday:

Each day of the festival starts (if you get up early enough!) with coffee and an opportunity to chat to other delegates. For the first two days, this was also an opportunity to wander around the Book Fair. I was really keen to make the absolute most of the weekend, though most people didn’t turn up until a little later.

P1000755 EDITED

Unless stated otherwise, these photos were taken by an actual photographer, rather than me.

Being there at quieter times was pretty handy, because when it got busy (such as immediately after Sebastian Faulks’ keynote speech) it actually got a little difficult to move about the place. I got talking to Matador (on the far left) who were kind enough to spread the word on Twitter. Continue reading