I Do Jewellery Now!

Flash Fiction Month may be over, but I’ve been busy ever since. I’m a member of a local arts and crafts society, and when one of the other members suggested that I sell my books at an upcoming tabletop sale, I thought “Why not?” But then it proved impractical to order in paperbacks, and I’m reluctant to encourage people to pay for my flash fiction collections since the ebooks are free, so it was pretty much just Face of Glass on disc. I actually feel like I’ve put together something really good–you get multiple ebook formats on the same disc as the audio of the three tales–but with a six foot table you really need to be selling more than just one thing.

Face of Glass CD ExteriorFace of Glass CD Interior

So I dusted off my tools and put in a couple of orders for some shiny new materials and I spent a week or two weaving bracelets. If I’m honest, it really was more about making the table look good–and not just showing up at a craft sale with a bunch of identical (if carefully produced) CDs like some kind of weirdo–than it was about making something I actually expected to sell. Still, I was pretty happy with the results.

This one has actually been sold, but the buyer wants a different kind of clasp.

This one has actually been sold, but the buyer wants a different kind of clasp so I’ve still got it for now.

I’ve been focusing on writing for the last couple of years–the last five or so if you count academic work–but before that I actually did quite a bit of jewellery. I had some in a local shop for quite a while, but despite having my work (more or less) available on the high street it didn’t do tremendously well. I sold a handful of things, and it brought in a bit of money, but the jewellery was most useful as an option for unique Christmas and birthday presents. I hate getting people chocolate or anything else you have once and then it’s gone, but it’s a nightmare trying to find something else different year after year.

Trailing Vine Necklace

Fun fact: I originally got into jewellery by making armour. The “leaves” of this trailing vine necklace are more commonly used in scale armour.

Long story short, I went in on Saturday morning thinking that if I made my money back on the table, I’d be happy. And I did! Plus a fair bit more. By the end of Saturday, as far as I was concerned, Saturday had been a roaring success. I’d made a little money, I’d got my books in front of a crowd for a whole day, and the jewellery had attracted a lot of attention. I was looking forward to more of the same the next day, but at that point Sunday was a bonus.

I came up with the idea of weaving a handful of brightly coloured anodised aluminium links into some items. It's subtle, but it makes a massive difference.

I came up with the idea of weaving a handful of brightly coloured anodised aluminium links into some items. It’s subtle, but it livens up the whole thing.

Sunday was not a bonus. Sunday was three times as busy. A lot more people stopped by my table and a lot more took an interest in the actual process of making the stuff. There were more kids around on Sunday, which definitely helped–they were really keen to find out more about how everything was put together and how long it took, and once I was talking to them more people came to listen. There was actually a bit of a crowd at one point!

The swirling sections of this chain are known as "Mobius Roses," so the clasp was an obvious match.

The swirling sections of this chain are known as “Mobius roses,” so the clasp was an obvious match.

But while the event was already a success just in terms of being a fun weekend with lots of interesting people, it turned out to be a very good move financially as well! It’s definitely not enough money to let me quit my day job, but since I don’t have a day job it’s pretty much the best thing I’ve got going on at the moment. It seems as though there are a lot of craft sales coming up nearby, and if this one is anything to go by then my main problem will be making things faster than people buy them! Admittedly that’s mostly down to the fact that these bracelets each take hours to make, but I feel like this is still a good position to be in. It’s got the added bonus of being something I can do in my own time, so I’ll be able to keep it up (or stop suddenly without seriously annoying an employer) while studying for my MA over the next year.

So it looks like I’ll be doing this again pretty soon, and I may even open up an online shop at some point. In the meantime, if you see anything you like then just let me know!

Advertisements

6 comments

  1. 500woerterdiewoche

    Wow, that looks amazing! I like the Möbius rose thing especially. It’s a bracelet, isn’t it?

    The set with the coloured aluminium rings also looks great. I like how the colour just adds a lively touch without stealing the show. It looks pretty heavy though. What materials do you use for your jewellery?

    • Damon Wakes

      Yes–I mostly work with bracelets because they’re big enough to offer some interesting design options, but not so big that they get impractical to make.

      Most of these are bright aluminium, which actually makes them deceptively light. Aluminium is about a third of the weight of steel, so large stones or clasps will generally contribute more to the weight of an item than the metal the chain is made of.

  2. ameliamackenzie

    Hey, I missed your chainmaille jewellry! 🙂 Good to know you’ve still got it.
    Funnily enough, I recognised those ‘leaves’ as scale armour before it occurred to me they were meant to look like leaves. The fantasy geekiness is deeply ingrained.

    • Damon Wakes

      Ha! Yeah, if you know what you’re looking for, that is the thing that springs to mind. At the craft table, I actually had a small scrap of scale sheet nearby to illustrate how they’re intended to be used (not that I’m the first person to make ornaments out of them). People are definitely interested in the armour side of things, and I think the fact that some of the very same weaves can be used for jewellery makes for quite a selling point.

  3. Pingback: Further Adventures in Jewellery Making | Damon L. Wakes
  4. Pingback: Book Fair Goodies | Damon L. Wakes

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s